Tips For Buying a Laser Sailing Dinghy

Buying a Laser

The points below are listed to assist someone who has little to no knowledge of Lasers, to help them in assessing the condition of the boat they are inspecting. Purchasing a Laser can be a large commitment, so understanding what to look for is invaluable so that you get the best value for money.

Budget

When you know how much money you are able to spend, there are a number of things that you have to consider when looking at various boats so that you don’t exceed your budget. If you simply buy a boat, even if it is advertised as ready to sail, you may have to fork out more for extras that you may not have been initially aware of. These may include –

  1. Clothing – including wetsuit and/or rash vest, life jacket, hat, sunglasses, boots, gloves, etc
  2. Trailer – these can be hard and expensive to source. Ideally, if you need to transport your Laser, you want to purchase one that comes with a trailer. Trailers can also be bought new (expensive) or 2nd hand (rare)
  3. Launching Dolly – makes it much easier to launch. This allows you to launch your Laser single-handedly
  4. Boat Cover – to protect your boat from dust, dirt, rain, etc
  5. Membership Fees – to sail and race out of a club, you will most probably need to become a member of that club. Contact your local club for details

Where to Look

The most common places to look for Lasers include –

  1. eBay
  2. Trading Post/newspaper classifieds
  3. Various Laser forums
  4. Laser dealers/shops
  5. Notice boards at sailing clubs

Inspecting a Laser – What to Check

  • Boat Number:. 200,000+ Lasers have been built worldwide to date. Lasers that have been built by a licensed Laser boat builder will have a unique International Laser Class Sailboat Sail number associated with the boat. For Lasers up to sail number 148199, the sail number is a number molded into the deck and should be located either on the transom (rear of the boat) or on the deck under the bow eye. Lasers with a sail number greater than 148200 should have a foil type sticker located at the back of the cockpit. Check the boat number to gauge how old the boat is.
  • Hull and Deck: Generally speaking, even for the best cared-for boats, they will over time collect scratches of varying degrees. However, most will be only cosmetic, affecting only the gel coat. As long as the underlying fiberglass layer located one or two millimeters below the gel coat is not exposed or damaged, hull integrity should not be compromised. Deck stiffness can be likened to the odometer in a car. The more give there is in the deck, the more use it has had. Check both sides of the cockpit (where you sit – the majority of your weight will be located here when sailing) as well as the cockpit floor. A boat with little use will have very little give in the deck when you press down firmly (only a millimeter or so). However, a boat that has had a lot of use will flex quite considerably (a centimeter or more). By testing the deck stiffness you can gauge the integrity of the hull. Boats lose stiffness with age, use, and leaks. One reason for soft spots in the deck to develop with use is when the fiberglass, foam and outer gel coat layers come apart or delaminate. A boat that has had a lot of use (especially aggressive or heavy weather sailing) may over time develop small cracks, which allow water to seep into the hull. These small cracks result in more flex or soft spots in the deck and hull, and water penetration adds to the overall weight. Depending on your needs and requirements of the hull, boats of differing condition will suit different people. For example, if you intend to only sail every so often simply for recreation, an older, softer (and cheaper) boat may suit your needs. However if you intend to race and be competitive, a newer, stiffer, lighter boat may be more suitable. Stiffer boats are generally more expensive and hold their value more than boats that are softer. One way to check to see whether water is entering the hull is to take out the drain plug in the transom (rear) and lift the bow of the boat. If water pours out this may indicate hull integrity issues. However, if no water comes out, there may still be leaks (it may have just been drained well and dried out by the owner).
  • Sail: The sail should be checked for signs of wear and tear. A new sail will have a crisp, stiff feel to the material, and have few creases. As the sail ages and stretches through general use, the material loses its stiffness and shape. A sail that has lost its shape it harder to tune, which can make it a handful in heavier breezes, as it can’t be flattened and downpowered as much as desired. If you are planning to race, then you will need an approved sail. This can be determined by checking that the sail has a red button near the foot of the sail (bottom corner of the sail, nearest to the mast). There are 3 different sail sizes, and depending on your experience, weight, strength, etc, you have to decide which rig you are after. They are the Laser 4.7, Radial and full rig. Make sure the sail comes with its 3 battens, which slide into pockets in the leech of the sail. The battens help give the sail shape and to stop it flapping. A good sail is important if you want to be competitive.
  • Foils (Centreboard & Rudder): The centerboard and rudder should be checked for straightness, and should not contain dents or gouges in the edges or surfaces. Foils that are warped or have damaged leading or trailing edges can slow the boat down. However small gouges or chips can be sanded out with fine sandpaper, while larger imperfections may need more complex gelcoat repairs. Many sailors store their foils in soft padded carry bags to prevent damage during storage and transportation. The centerboard and rudder should not be left in a hot car, as they may warp with heat. Foils that are warped may be able to be straightened with heat.
  • Spars (Mast and Boom): The mast is made up of 2 sections – the top and bottom sections. The mast and boom are made from aluminum and can be relatively easily bent. Bending of both the mast and boom is normal in everyday sailing, however, they should not be permanently bent. Both mast sections and the boom should be checked for straightness. This can be done by looking along the line of the spar, or by rolling it on a flat surface. Spars should also be checked for corrosion damage, especially where fittings are attached. Inspect all the rivets on the mast sections and boom for corrosion. Transporting you spars can be accomplished in a few different ways. Some simply tie down the spars to roof racks, and where possible carry the shorter sections inside their car. Other methods include using a couple of custom made foam or timber blocks or cradles, which have 3 recesses in each, that the spars neatly slot into. These cradles then sit on the deck and are tied down whilst traveling. Timber cradles should be padded on the bottom, so as to not scratch the deck.
  • Fittings: All fittings should be carefully checked to see that they are fully operational. Fittings include cleats, pulleys, eyelets, toe-rail, bailer, rudder attachment, etc. Anything that is faulty or is showing signs of wear and tear may need to be replaced and should be factored into the purchase price.
  • Ropes: All ropes should be checked for fraying or deterioration. There are 6 ropes on a laser (mainsheet, outhaul, vang, cunningham (downhaul), traveler, clew tie-down). They are cut to a specific length so that unnecessary rope is not in your way and getting unnecessarily tangled and knotted. Some of the ropes come with fittings permanently connected to the ropes. These include eyelets for the outhaul and cunningham, blocks, and cleat for the vang. Make sure they are all there.
  • Trailer: Trailers come in a variety of styles. Generally, trailers that are designed specifically to carry Lasers either support the boat directly or support a dolly which the Laser sits on (a dolly is a lightweight trolley which the boat sits on that can be easily maneuvred and enables the boat to be launched by a single person). Either way, it is critical that the location of the supports on which the Laser sits are in the correct location. Generally, these supports are located up under the outside edge at the bow, and also on both sides at the widest part of the hull. You want the trailer and dolly to be relatively rust free. Slight surface rust may not be an issue, but you may want to avoid trailers & dollies that contain more severe rust that may weaken the structure as a whole. You may also want a trailer that is registered for the road. Check the tires, electrics, and general structural integrity of the trailer. Other methods for transporting Lasers include on box trailers and on roof racks. These methods are generally less convenient, as they require at least 2 people to launch the boat, and, since they are not specifically designed for Lasers, do not travel as well on the road (they can bounce around and move on their supports).

When everything is laid out in front of you (eg. in the seller’s dark and cramped garage), especially when you are not familiar with Lasers, it may be hard to tell if all the equipment is there. Therefore you may want to rig the boat on its trailer when you are inspecting it, to make sure that –

  1. everything is included
  2. everything fits and works
  3. the sail and the mast/boom are a match (you don’t want a radial sail and a full rig mast)
  4. you know how to put it all together

This may not be required if you are a little more familiar, but initially you may find it beneficial, and a helpful seller with nothing to hide should be obliging.

4 Tips to Coming First in Club Dinghy Sailing Races

So you want to start coming first instead of last in club racing?

Well you have come to the right place! In this article you will learn how through just 4 simple tips you can improve your ranking in sailing to get third, second or even first place.

These tips are used so little by amateur racers that they always end up last and wondering why the same top few keep coming in the top positions for racing. The secrets of racing are revealed. Follow them and become a club sailing dinghy champion!

These 4 tips outline an entire race strategy that the pros use to come so high up in the rankings. In the next ten minutes prepare to delve into a world in which winning had become standard!

Tip Number One: The Start

Welcome to the race course sailor! The start is the most important part of any race and many novice sailors do not understand the significance of the start in relation to the rest of the race and this is where they go wrong.

The start is the single most important part of the race for most sailors as if they are only moderately skilled, a bad start will break them. Only very skilled and experienced sailors can claw back to the top from a bad start and if you are reading this article I am assuming you are not an extremely skilled or experienced sailors. I am expecting you to be quite good, but always coming between last and middle place. You want to get up there with the pros and start to get some wins under your belt.

Well look no further, the start is the most important part of the race.

Here is a list of strategies that you should use on the line if you want to have a good start and a potentially good race:

  • Get a stop watch! – The number of people I have seen without stop watches on a race is appalling. No wonder it is so easy for the experienced sailors to get some lead over the more novice ones. All serious sailing racers need a stop watch in order to start on time and in the right place without being caught unawares
  • Learn the Flag types – The flags are there to tell you what is going on in a race. So not knowing them is hardly going to help you understand what is going on in the race. It is highly advisable to find a good rulebook from your national sailing organization or the ISAF (International Sailing Federation) and learn all the flag types that will be shown at any given race. Preparation make Perfect!
  • Learn where the marks are – If you are thinking of club racing regularly, then you should learn where the common marks that are used for racing actually are so that when the committee boat shows the marks you don’t have to glance at a map constantly during the race. This kind of preparation is essential for any serious racer.
  • Do a Transit – This little known tactic is something that very few novice sailors know about and proves to be a very useful technique in order to have a good start. A transit is where you find put the boat between the committee boat and the pin buoy an look for a recognizable object on the other side of the pin. This tells you exactly where the starting line is and if there is a black flag shown, you will know whether you are over the line or not.
  • Find out if there is a bias – A biased line is one in which a certain tack is favoured. For instance a port bias is a start in which a port tack is favoured. To find out if there is a port bias, a starboard bias or if it is square (no bias), you can do it accurately or roughly. Doing it accurately requires a compass. Go along your transit and note the compass bearing. Then add 90 degrees to that bearing and turn to that heading. If the boat tacks then the current tack is the favoured tack and the bias. If the boat doesn’t tack then the current tack is the favoured tack and the bias. If the boat goes head to wind then there is no bias and it is a square line. You can roughly do this by seeing if you are beating up one end of the line and broad reaching down the other end. If it is a square line then you should be beam reaching from one end to the other
  • Starting Position – This is also highly important for competitive racing. If there is a bias then most of the boats will be there. If you don’t want to be in a scrum and get a rubbish start, then start slightly lower than the bias end or start on the opposite tack and then tack on to the biased tack after horn goes off. By doing this you will have your own unique heading and start. The worse thing you can do is follow somebody throughout the whole race, because whatever happens you will never win.

If you can master all or most of those tactics, then your starts will become better and better. Make sure that you go over the line on the horn and at full speed as well as using the above tips.

So now the boat has crossed the line. You are on the beat!

Tip Number Two: The Beat

This is the hardest point of sailing to master and this is also where the fleet spreads out with the well trimmed and faster boats at the front whilst the untrimmed and slower boats lag at the back.

A good beat can propel an okay or bad start to being in the top ten or top five position. Here are some great tactics to try and improve your position on the beat.

  • Keep the boat flat! – Another incredibly common past time that I see on the race course is boats heeling constantly though out the race. This is terrible for boat speed as the sail is pulled away from the wind. Make sure that the boat is flat at all times. To actually achieve this make make sure boat crew members are hiking out of the boat in a comfortable position. If this doesn’t help then let out some main sail and pinch (go further up wind), this should bring down the heel. the moment this happens pull the main sheet back in so that when the boat is flat the mainsail is fully in. This has the effect of a massive pump on the boat, which causes a burst of acceleration. Continue to do this throughout the beat and you will find yourself overtaking everyone who is heeling constantly, greatly improving your position. You can also use the kicker and cunningham in especially high winds to depower the sail and keep the boat flat, but you must remember to remove the kicker and cunningham when the wind dies down or there is a lull.
  • Sit forward in the boat – When the boat is not heeling your crew should be sitting on the centreboard and you should be sitting up against the shroud. Why? Because if you both sit back then the stern will act like a massive drag in the water causing the boat to slow down considerably. If you both sit forward the stern comes out of the water and the boat is no longer hampered by an extra dead weight in the water.
  • Make sure that the slot is trimmed – This is a very unknown technique in sailing. The concept of the slot is very technical and is to do with the physics of sailing and aerodynamics, but here is a simplified version. The slot is the distance between the Genoa and the mainsail. If the slot is too small the airflow becomes constricted and the front bottom of the mainsail begins to luff. If the slot is too large the Genoa begins to luff. The slot must be trimmed correctly so that the Genoa is about one and a half inches off the leeward shroud so as to provide optimal airflow. This slot distance changes with wind speed so it must be constantly watched by the crew. This is something that only experienced sailors know about and so should be utilized against other sailors to improve your position and gain some ground on your opponent.
  • Take lifts and avoid headers – Lifts and headers are where the wind changes direction. If the change is more to windward, it is called a lift and if the the change is more to leeward it is called a header. You should always take lifts and avoid headers by changing the boat’s direction. In a lift turn windward and in a header bear away. In big lifts you should always expect a large header, which could make you tack so be careful about overshooting and taking the lift too far. Lifts are useful by taking you more windward of your opponent, which means closer to the windward mark.

These techniques are rarely used by inexperienced sailors and if you use them you can climb to the top of the fleet in no time and no-one will understand how you optimized your sails or managed to go so fast.

Tip Number Three: Rounding Marks

In a typical course, there are three marks: the windward mark, the gybe mark and the leeward mark. Of course all courses will be more complicated than this, but all marks can be assigned one of these types.

There are some great rules you can utilize at marks in order to take the advantage when you reach the mark.

  • The starboard rule – The starboard rule is the most important rule in sailing. It says that a port tack boat must giveaway to a starboard tack boat. This means that if you approach a mark on port and there is also a starboard boat coming towards it you must either tack or bear away a little. As you can see when approaching a mark it is always best to be on starboard and you must take this into account during your beat.
  • The windward rule – The windward rule is also an important rule that states that a windward boat must keep clear of a leeward boat. This is very important at the windward mark, because it means that the leeward boat can push the windward boat further up in order for the leeward boat to go round the mark first. This only applies when the leeward boat’s bow or stern overlaps the windward boat’s bow or stern.
  • The water rule – This is exclusively for mark rounding and states that the inside boat that has an overlap with in a certain number of boat lengths of the mark can call for water in which the outside boat must allow the inside boat room to round the mark. The rule has been changed in the ISAF 2009-2012 rulebook. It used to be that if the inside boat (the boat between one boat and a mark) had an overlap within 2 boat lengths they could call for water. Now however the rule has been changed to 3 boat lengths and you must take this into account and work out if there is an overlap or not. If there is an overlap call for water. If not make space for the outside boat to round the mark.
  • Wide in and Tight out – This is a great technique to use to start beating just as you round a leeward mark. If you go slightly lower to leeward than the mark and then tighten up as you round the mark, you should end up with a little burst of speed and be higher than a boat that doesn’t do this tactic.
  • Keep control of your wind! – The boat behind you when you approach a mark on a beam reach will try to go windward of you so that they take your wind and you slow down. Instead of letting them take it go windward yourself and push them higher up on the course until they decide it isn’t worth it. Remember though that reaches are faster than going up wind so you have to calculate whether or not it is worth going up wind.

These are very important tactics for mark rounding that any pro sailor will use and not tell anyone else about. Use them and see how far up the fleet you get to.

Tip Number Four: The Run

Running is the slowest point of sailing. Most dinghy classes have spinnakers or gennakers that are large sail bags that capture the wind and pull the boat forward. All serious sailors should master the techniques of using spinnakers and gennakers before reviewing this tip of the article.

  • Sit backwards – This the opposite to the beat where you have to sit forwards, in the run you have to sit backwards. This is because the boat naturally pushes the bow into the water creating drag or in especially high winds capsizing the boat. Instead sit slightly backwards and allow the bow to right itself.
  • Don’t go on a dead run – Dead runs slow down boats. Remember that! The worst point of sail you can be on is a dead run as there is no aerodynamics creating forces. All that is pushing the boat along is the pressure of the wind against the sail. The fastest point of sail is the broad reach as there is a force created through the aerodynamics as well as the pressure of the wind against the sail. At all times try and get on to a broad reach to go to the next mark, because it is much, much faster than a dead run or even a training run. The sails are far more efficient at broad reaches than runs.
  • Take off the kicker, cunningham and out haul – Very, very important. The whole point of these ropes are to depower the sail. If they are all on at the point of sail, which is the slowest you will inadvertently be slowing and depowering the sail even further. Make sure all these ropes are hanging loose and that the sail is sufficiently powered as to move the boat. To remember whether or not you have kept them on or off, check out the speed of other boats and see if they are traveling faster or slower than you and then tweak to compensate.

The run is my favorite part of sailing, because I love sailing the spinnaker. It is also the precursor to the finish, which is usually on the beat. So to make your finished better just revise the information on beating, to give yourself and advantage over your opponents.

So that is the ultimate guide to sailing better. Review this a few more times or send it to your crew or helm so that you are both on the same wavelength. This is practically everything you need to know to improve your sailing and your racing finishing position.

On the racecourse just watch as you fly by your racing comrades and see their shocked faces and then tell them the secret by emailing them this ultimate guide to sailing and see the looks on their faces when they find out it is so simple.

Or be evil and keep it all to yourself!

I hope you have enjoyed this article as much as I have enjoyed writing it and will be continuing to think about it for the rest of the day with an excitement and apprehension that you feel as you get closer and closer to the time when you can put these tips into practice.